Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 1

Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 1

The Refrigerator that Sells Homes

Looking for a solid investment? As the stock market continues its roller coaster ride, and the value and viability of many businesses is called into question, discerning homeowners continue to look for the best way to invest their money. The importance of a safe, comfortable home continues to be a lasting investment and one thing remains constant – the purchase of a Sub-Zero refrigerator offers many benefits.

According to Forbes magazine, “Given the primary role the kitchen plays in the home, as a place to prepare meals, gather with family and the room that will sell the home faster and for more money, perhaps no kitchen appliance has more of that cache than Sub-Zero and its sister brands, Wolf for cooking and the new Cove dishwasher brand.”

An analysis of luxury home listings conducted by Zillow reported that mentioning a Sub-Zero refrigerator in the listing netted a 38% premium over other high-end listings with less prestigious refrigerators. In fact, reports Forbes, “if a kitchen sells the home, then Sub-Zero sells the kitchen.”

Not Just a Pretty Face – Uncompromising Food Preservation

While the Sub-Zero brand is considered a design standard and status symbol for many designers, real estate professionals and homeowners, the real reason Sub-Zero has stayed at the top of the appliance industry for more than 75 years is simple: American-made quality. Since Westye Bakke built his first free-standing freezer prototype in his Wisconsin basement in 1943, and then founded the Sub-Zero Freezer Company two years later, every design created and decision made by the company has had to live up to Bakke’s goal of quality without compromise.

As other brands have created look-alike products, Sub-Zero has continued to innovate to ensure that superior food preservation is always as important as the exterior design. Here’s where you learn that Sub-Zero is worth every penny…

Save Thousands in Fresh Food

Sub-Zero pioneered the dual refrigeration system with separate cooling systems for the refrigerator and freezer. This prevents hasty spoilage of fresh food and minimizes freezer burn. In Part 2 of our Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment series, you will learn more about the innovative engineering that will actually save you more than $1,000 every year.

Built to Last

Sub-Zero refrigerators and freezers are built in the company’s own facilities in Wisconsin and Arizona, exemplifying American manufacturing at its best. Sub-Zero controls every step of the process, with craftsmanship and testing performed by highly trained Sub-Zero professionals. Every appliance coming out of Sub-Zero is designed to last a minimum of 20 years. Major components are subjected to extreme stress tests prior to going into the final design and every major function on every unit is tested before shipping. In Part 4 of our Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment series,

you will hear about how Sean Clarke, president of New England’s Official Sub-Zero, Wolf and Cove Showrooms, learned in a very personal way about the longevity of these refrigerators.

Have it Your Way!
Innovating to provide what homeowners want has always been a driver for Sub-Zero. During the Depression, Westye Bakke was tapped by legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright to design

refrigerators for his visionary homes. A decade later, Sub-Zero pioneered built-in refrigeration with custom front panels to match any kitchen cabinet. In the 1960s, they built refrigeration into furniture and now, six decades later, Sub-Zero offers almost infinite options to integrate refrigerators and freezers into your home.

Is Sub-Zero your best investment? Seeing is believing. That’s why a Clarke Showroom appointment (either virtually or in person) is key to understanding the many reasons Sub-Zero is still considered the best refrigerator that money can buy.

 

 

Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 2

Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 3

Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 4

Sub-Zero: Your Best Investment – Part 5